LIFE IN ICELAND

(1848 - 1873) Sigurdur's Family Farm
Information from "Come into our Heritage RM of Argyle 1882-1982". 12.
Sigurdur was born on July 9,1848 in Neslondum, Myvatn, Iceland. His father, Kristofer Andresson died in 1865, during a typhoid epidemic. The whole family had been very sick at the time and their mother, Sigurveig Sigurdurdottir, was unconscious and very low. A kind neighbor helped the three older boys bury their father. The eight children,Kristveig, Sigridur, Sigurjon, Sigurdur, Hernit, Lilja, Pjetur, and Sigurborg never ceased to wonder at their mother's endurance and courage. She worked from eary morning until late at night, at the same time training her children to help as much as possible, in order to provide them with the bare necesssities of life. While knitting or mending, or making "shoes' for their feet, she would teach them to read and commit to memory prayers and hymns.


Scottish Viking Store
 

Meet our Relative - Christopherson Branch

Sigurdur Christopherson

1. OCCUPATION
2. ICELAND
3. EMIGRATION
4. KINMOUNT
5. Icelandic Deputation
6. NEW ICELAND
7. ARGYLE EXPEDITION
8. PILOT MOUND
9. GRUND
10. GRUND PO
11. IMMIGRATION AGENT
12. BALDUR
13. SWAN RIVER VALLEY
14. GRUND CHURCH
15. YTRANES

Sigurður Kristófersson
, son of Kristófer, later changed to Sigurdur Christopherson before Aug 1893, born 09 Jul 1848, in Ytri-Neslöndum í Mývatnssveit, Iceland, [15] [farm Ytri-Neslönd, Neslondum, in the beautiful Lake Mývatn district in Northern Iceland], Died, [13] MAR 27, 1921 at Crescent, Surrey, B.C., at age 72. Sigurdur passed away at Crescent, BC on Easter Sunday and was taken to Grund, MB for burial., [33]
"Upon arriving to New York. It was a dark night, but the city was shining with lights, the most beautiful sight Sigurdur had seen in his life. The young Icelanders then had their first taste of railway travel from New York to Milwaukee. From there the men set out looking for work. Sigurdur was hired by a farmer for $18 a month. He found the weather unbearably hot and found it hard to sleep at night; he became ill., [16]

Sigurdur was a pioneer of New Iceland , Postmaster in Baldur, General storekeeper and welcomed ALL of his neighbors. Helped when they needed a hand. Their homestead still stands today (Grund in Manitoba, CA)...barely.
There is No relationship to Kris Kristofferson, he is not Icelandic, to Roy's knowledge. Kris' father was born in Sweden. We have our own family actresses, Eileen Christy, Indira, Leona Oddstad, Sadie Pratt Sackett, along with many other talented people. They all could sing. Roy did a great Barry White imitation in the 80's.

It has been estimated that during the years 1870-1890 ten to twelve thousand people emigrated from Iceland to America, not such a small number considering that the remaining population was only about 70,000. After having examined the emigration records in the National Archives of Iceland I am inclined to believe that the number of emigrants has been underestimated. I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out to be somewhere between fifteen and twenty thousand on a more accurate count.
Source

"The first Icelander to settle in Canada was Sigtryggur Jónasson emigrated to Ontario in 1872.", [58]



NEW: Sigurdur working in Winnipeg article
Individual Facts:
Birth: 09 Jul 1848 in farm Ytri-Neslond, Neslondum, in the beautiful Lake Mývatn
district in Northern Iceland, [1], [4]
Emigration: 1873 in Canada?, [1] Halfdan, Helgason. "The Weekly Newsletter - Nr 39." The Emigration from Iceland to North America. Halfdan Helgason, 05 02 2004 . Web. Web. 2006. .
Farmed: Bet. 1877–1881 in huskavic, Grund, Ytranes í Víðinesbyggð
Property: Aug 1880 in Filed first homestead in Icelandic settlement of Argyle, N. of
Baldur, S.of Grund, [4]
Also Known As: 1887 in New Iceland; Sigurður Christopherson
Death: 27 Mar 1921 in Crecent, B.C., Canada, [2], [5], [6], [7]
Name: Kristófersson, Sigurður, [1], [2], [3]
Religion: Lutheran, [8]
Sex: Male

Occupation

: Argyle, Lisgar (County), Manitoba, Canada; Postmaster, Farmer, Immigration
Agent, [1]

Shared Facts: Caroline TAYLOR
Marriage: 22 Jan 1877 in Netley Creek, , Manitoba, Canada, [5]
Sealed to Spouse (LDS): 18 Feb 1998 in Glennview, Cook County, Illinois, USA, [10]
Marriage Fact: 1877 in First couple married at Gimli, Mamitoba, Canada, [9]

Page 17
"He named the country Grund (Plains) and Bru (Bridge)"..."...On account of floods at Gimli in 1878-79 and 1880 farmers had to drive their stock to other districts to be fed during the winter. In July 1880 Christian Johnson and Sigurdur Christopherson set out to look for greener fields. Their friend Everett Parsonage who had lived in New Iceland, wrote them of a promising land in Southern Manitoba. These two men traveled by row boat

Page 1 of 14 Tuesday, September 08, 2009 7:45:28 PM
Everett Parsonage who had lived in New Iceland, wrote them of a promising land in Southern Manitoba. These two men traveled by row boat to Winnipeg and by steam boat to Nelsonville where the closest land office
was. From there they walked to Pilot Mound and after three days' journey, they got to the home of their friend Everett Parsonage.

Venturing north, these three men followed Oak Creek to what is now Bru. There a tent was pitched by messieurs Parry and Esplin, indicated a little life. From there they traveled west to 12-6-14, and camped. Mr. Parsonage rode his pony south to the hill (west from where the Lutheran Church is now), turned around and galloped his horse back and told his comrades he had found paradise. Four or five sections were claimed immediately. They returned to Nelsonville to file the claim. Mr. Christopherson filed on S.W. 12-6-14. On Sept 25, 1880, Skafti Arason, wife and two small children, Skuli Arnason and family, G. Nordman and Sigurdur Christopherson left Gimli for their new homesteads.

Cabins built on their oxe-drawn sleighs brought these sturdy Vikings over the frozen prairie sea of snow and after two weeks of traveling in very cold and stormy weather, they reached their promised land. They camped close to Christopherson's haystack until the weather turned milder and then their building began. later that spring the settlement grew to eight families with the arrival of Mrs. Christopherson and children, Mr. and Mrs. Hearn, Mr. Halldor Arnason, Mr. Thorstein Johnson and Mr. B. Josephson. By 1881 these families had land ready for a crop, homes and stables built and plenty of hay. In 1883, many Icelanders came directly from Iceland with practically nothing but courage
and a vision of a better life in Canada....""...New Years Day, 1884, at the home of Bjorn Sigvaldason..."

"...The new community was named Frelsis, meaning absolute independence..." also description of first picnic at Jones' Lake in 1884,,, also nationalist; Peter Strang wrote... also One Sunday at Grund, 125 bicycles were counted...
End Source: The Baldur High school Centennial Committee, 1967? [See Reports & Books page]

his surname became Christopherson upon immigration. became a well known emigration agent as well as a leader amongst Icelandic settlers in both New Iceland and Argyle. He married Caroline Taylor, niece to John Taylor, an Englishman who was a great helper to the Icelandic settlers, mainly in New Iceland, Manitoba.Mormon census states
b. = 1850.
Had great faith in the future of Canadian and British institutions. [17]

Relationship Notes: This would confirm that Carrie and my GGrandfather were married during the epidemic at the creek's edge.

READ THE CHRISTOPHERSON FAMILY STORY

A series of adverts and articles on Sigurdur Christopherson. Logberg.articles.
So many they are placed here.

These travels from Iceland to the northern parts of America dating from the year 1865 are due to the initiative of a Dane by the name of William Wickmann, who had worked as a shop-assistant in Iceland for some time. In the year 1865 he emigrated to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Immediately he wrote to Iceland sending one of.his letters to his former employer, Gudmundur Thorgrimsen, a shopkeeper in Eyrarbakki.

...1870 when a few Icelanders began leaving for America, only four people, all of them from the south of Iceland, going west the first year. They settled down on Washington Island in lake Michigan, not far north of Milwaukee where Wickmann lived. It wasn't until 1873 that a relatively large group, about two hundred people, set off on their way to the Western World.

Source

Sigurdur Christopherson,
son of Kristófer Andresson and Sigurveig Sigurðardóttir
Sigurdur married Caroline TAYLOR
Sigurdur Christopherson
IMG_5169_PHOTO
Sigurdur Christopherson
Courtesy of The C.B.M. Collection


SIBLINGS:
1. Sigurborg Kristófersdóttir, , b. 23 Apr 1841 d. 29 May 1841, [73] (died at one month old)
2. Kristveig Kristófersdóttir, b. 25 Apr 1842-1880, [73]
3. Sigríður Kristófersdóttir Jónsson, b. 26 May 1843
4. Sigurjon Christopherson, b. 05 Oct 1844
5. Gudbjorg Kristófersdóttir, b.8 June 1846, 7 Sept 1846, [73]
6. Gudny Kristófersdóttir, b. 30 May 1847, d. 30 May 1847, [73] (Twins)
7. Gudrun Kristófersdóttir, b. 30 May 1847, d. 30 May 1847, [73] (Twins)
8. Sigurdur Kristofersson, b. 09 Jul 1848 d. Mar 1921
now Christopherson
9. Hernit Christopherson, b. 01 Jul 1850
10. Lilja Ingibjörg Kristófersdóttir, b. 16 Dec 1851
11. Peter/Pjetur/Pétur Christopherson, b. 24 Sep 1853
12. Sigurborg Hallgrimsson , b. 27 Sep 1855
13. Kristján Kristófersson, b. 30 Oct 1858. d. 6 Dec 1859, [73]
died at 1 yr old

m. Caroline Taylor

CHILDREN:
1, Jón 'John' S. Christopherson, b. 1877
2. William Christopher Christopherson, b. Abt. 01 Mar 1879
3. Haldor Briem Christopherson, b. 17 Jul 1882
4. Sigurveig 'Veiga' Christopherson Dawe, b. 14 Feb 1884
5. Súsanna Sigurðardóttir Christopherson Brynjólfsson,
b. 07 Jan 1886
6. Kjartan Christopherson, b. after 1886 and bef. 1890
7. Lylia S Christopherson, b. 19 Oct 1890

Great Grandfather of Roy Christopherson

ALSO SEE
Read about Sigurdur's Siblings
"Come into our Heritage" book excerpt
(Photos included)
Christopherson Clan Page

Sigurdur Christopherson"Articles on Sigurdur
Homesteads: 1. Ytri-Neslond, Neslondum, Lake Mývatn

2. Husavik Homestead (New Iceland)

Argyle District Map

3. Grund Homestead

Grund Church Page

4. Ytranes Homestead Page


sigurdur
Courtesy of the C.B.M. Collection, [47],

christophersons
Sigurdur & Caroline Taylor Christopherson Family

The original print resides with the family in Grund
from the Come into our Heritage Book





Iceland - Where 7/8ths of Roy's family branches lived for over 1,000 yearsIceland

Sigurdur worked for a neighboring farmer, but wages were poor. Late every fall he went up the mountains searching for sheep that had not been found the first time of fall roundup. These trips were fraught with danger and hardship. Any sheep found so late in the fall and winter were equally divided between the owner (all sheep are marked in Iceland) and the one who found them. In this way he made more money than his wages.When he was 25 years old, he managed to save enough to pay his passage to America. He saw it was not possible to live in Iceland except in poverty and he thought how much better it would be to live in a country where grain, fruit and vegetables would grow. No one from their part had emigrated from Iceland and everyone thought it a foolish move.

A few days before Whit Sunday 1873, Sigurdur bad farewell to family and friends who had accompanied him to the seaport town of Husavik. There he boarded a small sailing vessel called 'Hjalmar', that was leaving for Norway. Among those who took passage on the same boat were Gudrun and Gudfinna Aradottir (Sisters of Skafti), and Jon Halldorson. They carried their baggage down into the boat and then helped to haul the boat out into deep water. They sailed at 10pm. CONTD. [New 28]

Eventually, Sigurdur brought over his brothers, sisters, young cousins, and his mother Sigurveig to America. 12.

READ MORE ABOUT MYVATN ICELAND

Homestead 1
Iceland
Sigurdur's Original Homestead property now has
the
Sigurgeirs Bird Museum
When in Iceland, please visit this Bird Watchers paradise - Ytri Neslond Myvatn, Iceland

 


ASKJA
A series of hard winters, cold summers, pack ice, violent winds, heavy snow and sand storms led to land erosion, crop failure, poor harvests, little fodder for animals and loss of livestock throughout the country. In 1875, an eruption of the volcano Askja covered parts of the North and East with poisonous ash and pumice, adding to the already desperate situation of many farmers. Source






Husavik_named after 1st homestead
IMG_WEB_0888
Husavik, Iceland, name used for 1st homestead
in New Iceland (South of Gimli)
where Sigurdur emigrated from.
Arms
The Arms show a Viking ship.
Húsavík was the first place in Iceland
to be settled by vikings, but only for one winter.
The first settler also gave the name
to the town, house-bay.
Ytri Neslond
Sigurdur's Original Homestead - Ytri Neslond
Myvatn, Iceland
Imagine, Sigurdur and his family looked out from here
to one of the nicest lakes in Iceland.
Courtesy of the Mike Christopherson Collection
Hekla_1849
Volcano Errupting
Hekla in 1849 By Emanuel Larsen
 
SSHarald
S/S Harald Haarfagre,
The Norwegian American Steamship Company
Possibly the ship Sigurdur took to NY 1873



Nelson Gerrard is translating Sigurdur's diary from Bob Christopherson

EMIGRATION TO AMERICA

(1873) Iceland to America
PREV...The next morning the mate handed them small portions of butter and sugar which, he told them, must last a week. They were also served with bread, meat and coffee three times a day. The sea became rough and the girls and some of the men became seasick.

On Whit Sunday there was a southwest storm with driving rain, it was difficult to manage the boat. At mid-day they were east of Lauganesi and that was the last they saw of their homeland. Two days later the weather was delightful and they found it interesting to watch a large number of whales that were swimming around the ship. All were in good spirits. The girls ventured on deck and were amused when SIgurdur and Jon each hemmed a handkerchief for them, but did not consider it fine sewing.

At 1pm, Trinity Sunday [June 8, 1873?], they came in sight of Norway. Upon reaching the harbor town of Christianson, the Agent of the S.S. Co. arranged passage for the young Icelanders on the S.S. Harold.[43] [The S/S Harald Haarfager?] [44]
The food was much better on this ship, and although the days were monotonous with no amusements, the weather was good.

On June 30, 2 am they arrived in New York. It was a dark night, but the city was shining with lights, the most beautiful sight Sigurdur had seen in his life. The young Icelanders then had their first taste of railway travel from New York to Milwaukee. From there the men set out looking for work. Sigurdur was hired by a farmer for $18 a month. He found the weather unbearably hot and found it hard to sleep at night; he became ill.. 12.

Locate activity from June 30, 1873 to June 18 where Sigurdur worked in U.S. for 2-3 years Milwaukee, WIS.

KINMOUNT: LIFE IN CANADA (1874)


Caroline 'Carrie' TAYLOR sees an Icelander - Which Changes All Their Lives

This 2 page PDF by Charles Cooper cites Alan Rayburn, and Guy Scott that the Icelanders working on the Railway in Kinmount. If 1873-1874 then it would become Victoria Railway.The Tale of the Icelanders and Their Trestle here.

Added to the internet by skitang6 on 11 Nov 2007
Information from "Come into our Heritage RM of Argyle 1882-1982" 12.
Caroline (Carrie) Taylor was born May 11, 1856, the daughter of William Stuart Taylor and Isabella Slimmons. Her early childhood was spent in Kingston, Ontario, later the family moved to Lansing, Michigan. When Caroline was nine years old, her mother died, leaving five daughters. There followed a sad period when these five little girls in heavy mourning (black dresses trimmed with black crepe) lived with their grief-stricken father. Strangers would stop them on the street and ask them whom they mourned, and the girls would burst into tears. Carrie, in later years, had a strong aversion to mourning, especially for children. Uncle John Taylor and Aunt Elizabeth came to the rescue and took the girls to live with them in Haliburton, Ontario.

When their father [William] remarried, Carrie and Anna returned home, Susie and Jane remained with their aunt and uncle and Elizabeth married. The next few years saw Carrie attend High school and graduate as a teacher. When she was 16 her 'hair went up and her skirts were lowered' and she went out to teach at a country school. She also apprenticed as a dressmaker, soon becoming good at sewing and cutting out garments which required much tucking, ruching and gathers in those days. On a trip to visit her aunt, uncle and sisters in Haliburton, the last night of the journey was spent at Kinmount. Next morning at breakfast, the waitress drew her attention to the window, and looking out, she saw an Icelander for the first time, a beautiful young woman with long golden hair and pink and white complexion, wearing a simple blouse and dark skirt. This happened to be 12

Page 3 of 14 Tuesday, September 08, 2009 7:45:28 PM
Gudney, wife of Fridjon Fridrikson [Paul Frederickson, son of Fridfinnur and Halldora Fridfinnson & Gudny, daughter of Jon and Helga (Jonasdottir) Olafson]. She was to become Carrie's lifelong friend. As she continued on her journey, little did Carrie realize how much this encounter would change her life. Her Uncle John was doing missionary work for the British Bible Society and when she told him about the Icelanders at Kinmount, he was very interested and lost no time in going there to see if he could be of any service to them. He met Fridjon Fridrikson and Sigtryggur Jonasson, and was much impressed by the sincerity and honesty of these fine people. He set about helping them get financial help to see them through the rugged winter; provision was also made for a scouting party to go west in search of a more suitable site for settlement.

Carrie returned to Lansing in the spring, and in the fall she went to Manitoba with her father, his wife and three children. They joined Uncle John's party at Sarnia. Traveling by boat, they arrived at Duluth after nine days, and stayed that night in a hotel. They went by train to Glinden and stayed all night in a roundhouse, then went by train to Fisher's Landing on the Red River. Here they went by train to Fisher's Landing on the Red River. Here they went on board a riverboat, the 'International'. The river was very low. After nine days they reached Garry (Winnipeg). There they lived on a flatboat until the rest of the journey could be made. Here they met Dr. Schultz who was interested in this new colony. 12.

Carolines Sister's Susie and Janie [JaneTAYLOR Hearn] rowed Lord Dufferin across the lake., [31]

READ MORE ABOUT WILLIAM & JOHN TAYLOR

Here is a story from the Kinnmount Gazette 2012
Icelandic Connection Uncovered, Part 1

Also see The Life & Times of William Stewart Taylor, Rosa Banks page, and The Come Into Our Heritage Excerpt.

This is text from an Icelandic Calendar Sent to Roy by Ed Fader
Sigurður Kristófersson, the son of Kristófer Andrésson and Sigurveig Sigurðardóttir of Ytri-Neslönd on Lake M´yvatn in Northern Iceland, emigrated at age 25 in 1873, among the first of his countrymen to come to North America. After two years in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he [Sigurdur] joined the exploratory party which selected the ‘New Iceland’ site on Lake Winnipeg in the summer of [NOV] 1875.
(Photo and poem courtesy of Donna Skardal).
Kingston ONT
Old Map fo Kingston, Canada

Canada Map
Sigurdur settled first in Gimli/Husavik,
then Argyle Dist., Manitoba,
then British Columbia

Lord Dufferin
A Young Governor General Lord Dufferin
(source)
Lord Dufferin was a friend to the Icelanders
and instrumental in the New Iceland Colony.
Stipple engraving of Frederick Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood,
1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava as a young man.

Icelandic Deputation -Kinmount


"Minister of Immigration at Ottawa...financing an expedition headed by John Taylor, together with delegates elected by the settlers, to explore the Red River Valley for a suitable site. The settlers elected" John, Sigtyggur, and Einar [source - Pp 11
John Taylor
John Taylor
Roy's Great
Our Great Grand Uncle
Sigtryggur Jonasson
Sigtryggur Jonasson
Father of New Iceland
Einar Jonsson
Einar Jonasson
Courtesy of The Gimli New Iceland Museum
Soon replaced by GrG.D.'
Contd. live in Gimli
1902
Skafti Arason
Roy's Great Grand Uncle; Gudrun Sigvaldson's brother. "...on own account"
KristjanJonsson
Kristján Jónsson
"...went with them on their own account"
Sigurdur Christopherson
Sigurdur Kristófersson [Christopherson]

Our Great Grandfather
He was in Milwaukee
.
"...on own account"

NEW ICELAND, WILLOW POINT - NOW GIMLI


(Between 1877–1881)

This is text from an Icelandic Calendar Sent to Roy by Ed Fader
"...Sigurður first settled south of Gimli and named his homestead ‘Húsavík’ after ‘the last Icelandic soil’ he set foot on, and as a post office was established in his home on July 1, 1878, the district eventually became known as ‘Husavik’. He married in New Iceland, in a ceremony performed over Netley Creek during the smallpox quarantine, to Carrie Taylor, a daughter of William Taylor (brother to John Taylor), whose homestead on Willow Creek was called ‘Forest Home’..."
(Photo and poem courtesy of Donna Skardal).

The Pioneers landed at Willow Point. Sigurdur was instrumental in scouting out the site a year earlier and traveled to Iceland and Swan River as an Emigration Agent. He was almost thrown out of Iceland during a visit to bring another party and shouted down during a meeting by students no less (11). Leaving the motherland at that time was frowned upon. They intended to land north near Hecla island in the north of Lake Winnipeg. The weather changed and the captain let them off at Willow Point, where they set up a quick camp and built one log cabin for the food. This would be near current day Gimli, Manitoba, Canada in the harbor. [Sigurdur settled on Husavik - Huskavic, Grund, Ytranes í Víðinesbyggð], [14]
Read more on the Husavik Homestead page within this website, and how they really married..

Information from "Come into our Heritage RM of Argyle 1882-1982"
"Sigurdur met Carrie Taylor here in Kinmount and they were married on January 22, 1877. Because the Icelandic Settlement was under smallpox quarantine, they stood on one side of Netley Creek (the quarantine line) and the Metis minister stood on the other side.
From the internet added by skitang6 (ancestry.com) on 11 Nov 2007., [27]

"Sigurdur had taken a homestead and named it 'Hasavik' [Husavik], there they farmed for four years until moving to Argyle Municipality. Two sons were born at Husavik, Jon Sigurdur and William Christopher. In the spring of 1881, the move was made to their new homestead of 'Grund', NE 10-6-14 in Argyle. Their household effects, stove, dishes, and aprecious box of books, were shipped to Portage la Prairie, but were lost in transit. They lived in a tent and Carie cooked over a campfire all summer until a small one-room cabin was built. In 1882, a third son was born, Halldor (named for Halldor Briem who had married Susan Taylor). There were no doctors; Rebecca Johnson came from Winnipeg to take care of Carrie who was so sick".
From the internet added by skitang6 (ancestry.com) on 11 Nov 2007

"The quarantine lasted 228 days, and was maintained for more than four months after the last case of smallpox. The quarantine had a serious effect on the colony. Local produce, in- cluding fish and knitted goods t could not be sold on the outside. The people were deprived of all opportunity to seek employment in the province. In the spring purchase and transport of seed and farm implements were delayed."

Later at New Iceland, illness broke out and the area was quarantined. Imagine the Reverend on the one side of Netley Creek and Sigurdur marrying Caroline Taylor on the other, because he could not enter the restricted area. They settled for a couple years and moved to the Argyle RM district. [Update FEB 2013: According to Ryan Eyford's research, this story did not take place across the Creek]

Roy found that not only was Sigurdur a Great Grandfather, he was also in history books about New Iceland. And not just one book, but many! Roy could post many pages about New Iceland, however, why not let a real expert, Nelson Gerrard guide you through that period of history. Gimlunga Saga, the story of the Icelandic settlement at Gimli in New Iceland, Manitoba
http://www.halfdan.is/vestur/gimli2.htm

" The chairman of the meeting at Kinmount, Sigtryggur Jónasson, had never been a supporter of Ólafsson’s plan. He considered it to be impractical and believed that in Alaska the Icelanders would be just as isolated from modern civilization as they had been in their homeland. 48 The Kinmount meeting selected Sigtryggur and Einar Jónasson as delegates to examine land in Manitoba along with Baptist missionary John Taylor. 49 While Sigtryggur was the established leader of the Kinmount Icelanders, Einar was likely chosen in part to make the delegation reflect the regional distribution of the settlers; the former was from Eyjafjararssla while the latter was from Dalassla. Kinmount settlers Kristján Jónsson, Skafti Arason also joined what Taylor called the ‘Icelandic Deputation.’ A sixth member, Sigurdur Kristófersson [Christopherson], joined the party in Milwaukee.
These three men were from the ingeyjarssla region. Except for the sixty-two year-old missionary Taylor, all the members of the Icelandic Deputation were unmarried and in their early to mid-twenties.
Citation: Verify source. Ryan?

49
LAC, RG 17, A I 1, volume 315, docket 14103, Taylor to the Minister of Agriculture, 5 June 1875.

Winnipeg Free Press 6 April 1955
ONE OF THE ORIGINALS, HE STILL CHOPS WOOD
BY: FRANK CONLON

Eighty years ago this fall, the first group of Icelandic people to settle in Manitoba, arrived in this part of the country and founded what is now the Town of Gimli on the shores of Lake Winnipeg. Of the approximately 350 hardy pioneers who made the trip west, and then by scow down 60 miles of the Red River to the scene of the new settlement, but one man survives today. He is Vigfus Arason, who lives in Husavik, four miles south of Gimli, on the land which his father homesteaded in 1877, two years after the colony was founded. Mr. Arason, who now is in his 89th year, was only a lad of eight when he came with his parents, brothers ans sisters on this great migration to a new home. He recalls today some of the hardships of that adventure, but at the same time points out how well everything turned out and how happy the Icelandic people became in their new home.

After spending a winter in Ontario enduring many hardships, the new settlers took the advice of the Federal Government, who had been looking for a place to settle, and headed for Lake Winnipeg. "It was October 22, 1875, when we arrived at Gimli after being hauled up the river from Winnipeg on scows" says Mr. Arason. "Within a week 10 houses were built, with logs and straw for roofs", he recalls. The pioneers, when they arrived set up their own community on the west shores of the lake, and for 12 years lived under the government they themselves established. Gimli, Mr. Arason remembers, was no paradise the first winter. The day after their arrival there was a heavy fall of snow, accompanied by severe frost. Shelters had to be hastily constructed. Food was dear and scarce. There were no roads and no means of getting food into the settlement. That year the fishing was poor and suffering was extreme.

New hope came with the spring. The government stepped in with assistance and supplied cattle to the colony. For 51 years Mr. Arason fished on Lake Winnipeg until his retirement. Today, still in good health - he chops wood daily and often goes to the store. Mr. Arason, who is a bachelor, lives with his sister-in-law, Mrs. Gudlaug Arason, and her son Jon, who today farms the homestead. Two weeks ago Mr. Arason was presented to Canada's Governor-General, Vincent Massey, on the occasion of his recent visit to Gimli. In his declining years, Mr. Arason looks at the approximately 20,000 people of Icelandic descent who now live in Manitoba, points out with pride the record of their achievements in this land of their adoption and with a feeling of loneliness remembers that he is the last surviving link with the past.
Courtesy of our cousin in Husavik

According to Nelson Gerrard, author of the 'Icelandic River Saga', Sigurdur was Postmaster at Husavik (south of Gimli) in 1878.

History of the lcelandic Settlements At the Narrows, Manitoba by Geirfinnur Peterson
In the winter of 1893 an agent for the Canadian government came to our part of Iceland to try to encourage immigration of Icelanders to Canada. This agent, Sigurdur Christopherson, had been born in the same settlement and had  gone to Canada some eighteen years  earlier. He...Read more.
Source: http://timarit.is/view_page_init.jsp?pageId=2230227

Other Reading
Icelanders in North America: The First Settlers edited by Jonas Thor

Found another article on Sigurdur & Caroline, and her new photo, except in Icelandic
In the family portrait, Carrie is facing left.


Another Icelandic settlement story about the family by Ingibjorg Jonsson.

This Icelandic Article talks about how Caroline and John Taylor changed the lives of the Icelanders in 4 columns. Wish it was translated.

READ MORE ABOUT NEW ICELAND - HUSAVICK

Willow Point Manitoba
Willow Point Landing
Image obtained from the Icelandic Association
of Municipalities (Samband Íslenzkra Svetarfélaga)


New Iceland Log Cabins
/IMG_1536_PHOTO
New Iceland Log Cabins in Winter
Courtesy of Evergreen Regional Library - 63½ First Avenue, Gimli, MB



Christophersons
IMG_SCAN_4008_
John, Sigurdur, William & Caroline Christopherson
Aft. Mar 1879, Circa 1881
Kindly sent "Reprint from Evie" [Evelyn Christopherson Ruccius in the past ]
Courtesy of The Sig & Hank Christopherson Collection [59]
Children may be visa-versa

ARGYLE EXPEDITION (1881)

...Ahnlnm Parsonap, born 1814, in the County of IQ. England; a butcher by profession; unnied ibethMaryTesterin l843-'l1|ecnupleIts|mnir:din lkparishchurchof&#64257;rithaccnrdingtothecstablished LehofEnglandaftc1'lnnmbyRidnrdDa\&quot;ies Elimbeth and Abraham had &#64257;ve &#64257;ldren; Abraham William, 1844, Charles Tater, 18-I6, Wilham Lee, 1848, Henry Josiah, 1850, Edward Len. 1852. Elmbeth Mary died in 1852. In 1854, Abraham Parsonage married Anne Filewood. This union brought forth &#64257;ve more children; Everett, 1855, Frederick, 1857, 1859, Marion Theresa, 1860 and Elinor, 1862. In 1863, Abraham and his wife Mary Anne immigrated to Canada. With them came Henry Josiah, of the &#64257;rst family, and younger children of the second The three oldest boys remained in England, presumably. To quote from an early history book, &ldquo;Abraham Parsonage, 1814-1892, was a successful meat wholesaler of Fleet Street, London, came to Canada in 1863 and homesteaded Lot 1, Concession 5, Dysart township, county of Haliburton, Ontario, Canada.&rdquo; Apparently this wooded homestead on the shores of portunity arose. Henry Josiah Parsonage arrived at Dysart, Ont., 1863, with his father Abraham and step-mother Mary Anne, at the age of 13 years. Henry left the family home at the age of 18 and had plenty of work at Boyd&rsquo;s sawmill at Bobcageon, Ont. He joined the Good Templer&rsquo;s Church and did a lot of lay preaching in the lumber camps in the Haliburton area of Ontario.<br>
<br>
In 1874, Henry Josiah Parsonage married Emmeline Bowman of Bobcaygeon, Ont. This union produced a daughter, Marion Parsonage, born Jan. ll, 1875. Emmeline died at Bobcageon June 7, 1875, age 24. The baby Marion was baptized June 8, 1875, and died June 20, 1875. After this sad interlude in his life, Henry spent the next couple of years working the lumber camps of the area and preaching on Sundays. In 1879, Henry joined a group of people from the Peterborough area of Ontario and moved west into Manitoba. <b>Everett Parsonage</b>, eldest child of Abraham&rsquo;s second marriage, came to Canada with his parents in 1863, when he was eight years old. He grew up in the backwoods of Ontario along with his brother Fred. They became ex-cellent woodsmen, canoe paddlers and fishermen, which prepared them well for their exploits on the western frontier in later years. To quote from the National Archives letter written by their mother: &ldquo;Everett and Fred are grown to stalwart backwoodsmen. Equally at home with the axe and rifle, holding the plow or paddling their canoe, spearing trout or netting herring, which in spring and fall are plenty in the lake on the shore of which we live. They work hard and, living constantly in the open air, are healthy and strong.&rdquo; Everett and Fred took up homesteads about 20 miles from the family farm. The boys, after their backwoods upbringing, found farming rather dull and Everett at least was looking for a life with a little more adventure. It wasn&rsquo;t long in coming. canoe, spearing trout or netting herring, which in spring and fall are plenty in the lake on the shore of which we live. They work hard and, living constantly in the open air, are healthy and strong.&rdquo; Everett and Fred took up homesteads about 20 miles from the family farm.
Henry and Elizabeth Parsonage
Courtesy of 'Come Into Our Heritage' book Available still
Henry Parsonage

The boys, after their backwoods upbringing, found farming rather dull and Everett at least was looking for a life with a little more adventure. It wasn’t long in coming. A group of about 500 Icelanders had arrived at Port Hope, Ont., on their way to settle around the Gimli area of Manitoba. The Icelandic agent, John Taylor, was looking for a guide with wilderness experience to help them on their trip westward. He heard of young Everett Parsonage and commissioned him for 10 months, at $10.00 a month, to be their guide. It was 1875 when they left Port Hope. They went by boat to Duluth. From there they came by Northern Pacific to Fisher’s Landing. Here they commenced their long journey on the Red River, in flat bottom boats, to the mouth of the Red River. Here they were met by a Hudson Bay steamer and towed to Willow Island, where they disembarked after a very long and tedious journey.

It was on this trip that Everett became close friends with Sigurdur Christopherson, Skafti Arason, Kristjan Jonsson, John Taylor and many more of the Icelanders. Five years later, in 1880, when Everett was established on his homestead in Pilot Mound, he was instrumental in persuading the Icelanders to explore the possibilities of starting another settlement in the Tiger Hills area, now the Municipality of Argyle. Two letters written by John Taylor to Everett Parsonage have recently been found in an old trunk of Everett’s. The first, dated
“Gimli 8th October 1880”,
speaks of a drove of 26 head of cattle which John Taylor was sending out to Everett to winter over for him at Pilot Mound.

The second letter is dated
“Gimli Jan. 23, 1881”
and is apparently in response to a letter sent by Everett on Jan. 11, 1881. The cattle seem to have arrived at Pilot Mound in a very run-down condition (not surprising after their long trek from Gimli). Everett must have written to John Taylor explaining the condition of the cattle and enquiring of him what expense and what action he thought advisable. To quote the first paragraph of the 1881 letter
“Dear Everett Yours of the llth is received.
I am sorry to hear such bad news about the cows.
It is no use going to expenses to send a man to look at them.
Surely you and your father know what is best to be done.
If I had not all confidence in your honour and judgement
I should not have sent the cattle to you.”

The letter goes on with advice as to which cows a special effort be made to save, some feeding advice, and which animals might just as well be killed. Towards the end of the letter, one paragraph is of special interest to the Argyle municipal history and is quoted:
“Several families from this quarter start talk of starting middle of March to their prairie lots. I shall either remain here or at Selkirk until they settle in one way or other.” The letter is signed
Yours truly, John Taylor Icelandic Agent

The prairie lots of which John Taylor speaks in this paragraph are in the Grund district in Argyle municipality. The first group of five settlers and their families arrived on April 1. They were followed that summer by three more families and the following year there were 17 families. By 1890, there were 700 Icelanders in the Argyle district. Henry Josiah Parsonage and his father Abraham and family arrived at Pilot Mound in 1879. They had been lured by Everett’s glowing reports of the fine soil and future prospects of the area. Henry remained at Pilot
[Missing source of this text]
Letters are mentioned here: http://www.argyleheritage.ca/wemade/p6.html

Settlement in Grund, 1881, 14 persons, Sigurdur farmed
NE 34, 5, 14
NE 21, 5, 14
S. 1/2 23, 25, 14
S. 1/2 10, 6, 14

Page 596-597 on Everett for here
"In March 1881, Gudmunder Gudmundsson Nordman came to Argyle with Skuli Arnarson, Sigurdur Christopherson, Skapti Arason and another man. They traveled in a covered sleigh drawn by oxen and reached Argyle in 19 days"
[Pg 585, source, 12].

Fridbjorn Frederickson was one of the first five Icelanders discovered and filed homestead land claim in the Municipality of Argyle,
in 1880. Fridbjorn and Haldor Arnason walked all the way from New Iceland with a heard of cattle to Pilot Mound. They walked along
with three other men, namely: Sigurdur Christopherson, Kristjan Jonsson and Skafti Arason, all through the Argyle settlement to choose a community colony for the Icelanders.
pp 414-415 'Come Into Our Heritage' book 12
Sigurdur Christopherson
Sigurdur Kristófersson
[Christopherson]
Gudmunder Gudmundsson Nordman
Gudmunder Gudmundsson
Nordman12
1902
Skafti Arason12
Roy's Great Grand Uncle;
Gudrun Sigvaldson's brother
Fridbjorn Fredereckson
Fridbjorn Frederickson12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No Photo
Haldor Arnason
 
   
Another source is 'Icelanders in North America: The First Settlers' By Jonas Thoris

GIMLI, MB TO PILOT MOUND


From The Baldur High school Centennial Committee, 1967? on Sigurdur Christopherson
2 staples and a masking tape like with cross thread for binding.
50 - 100 pages long
Page 2 gives credits, but no dates. One drawing/comment leads me to believe it was done in 1967.
Many crude drawings throughout.
28 pages of photos with captions.
Maps of the old/current settlements and descriptions of them, like Rock lake.

Page 17
"...He [Sigurdur Christopherson] named the country Grund (Plains) and Bru (Bridge)..."

"...On account of floods at Gimli in 1878-79 and 1880 farmers had to drive their stock to other districts to be fed during the winter. In July 1880 Christian Johnson and Sigurdur Christopherson set out to look for greener fields. Their friend Everett Parsonage who had lived in New Iceland, wrote them of a promising land in Southern Manitoba. These two men traveled by row boat to Winnipeg and by steam boat to Nelsonville where the closest land office was. From there they walked to Pilot Mound and after three days' journey, they got to the home of their friend Everett parsonage.

Click to enlarge

Venturing north, these three men followed Oak Creek to what is now Bru. There a tent was pitched by messieurs Parry and Esplin, indicated a little life. From there they traveled west to 12-6-14, and camped. Mr. Parsonage rode his pony south to the hill (west from where the Lutheran Church is now), turned around and galloped his horse back and told his comrades he had found paradise. Four or five sections were claimed immediately. They returned to Nelsonville to file the claim. Mr. Christopherson filed on S.W. 12-6-14. On Sept 25, 1880, Skafti Arason, wife and two small children, Skuli Arnason and family, G. Nordman and Sigurdur Christopherson left Gimli for their new homesteads [now known as 'Argyle District' north of Baldur, and south of Glenboro, Manitoba, Canada..
MAP (See Argyle page)

Cabins built on their oxe-drawn sleighs brought these sturdy Vikings over the frozen prairie sea of snow and after two weeks of traveling in very cold and stormy weather, they reached their promised land. They camped close to Christopherson's haystack until the weather turned milder and then their building began. Later that spring the settlement grew to eight families with the arrival of Mrs. Christopherson and children, Mr. and Mrs. Hearn, Mr. Halldor Arnason, Mr. Thorstein Johnson and Mr. B. Josephson. By 1881 these families had land ready for a crop, homes and stables built and plenty of hay. In 1883, many Icelanders came directly from Iceland with practically nothing but courage and a vision of a better life in Canada...."

"...New Years Day, 1884, at the home of Bjorn Sigvaldason..."

"...The new community was named Frelsis, meaning absolute independence..."
Correction by Kommi: "...The new community was named Frelsið, meaning absolute independence..."

also description of first picnic at Jones' Lake in 1884,,,
also nationalist; Peter Strang wrote...
also One Sunday at Grund, 125 bicycles were counted...
End Source: The Baldur High school Centennial Committee, 1967?

Mike and Roy Christopherson passing through Pilot Mound on way to Baldur in Aug., 2013. Roy doing a bad impression of Everett.

1
IMG_WEB_0148
Courtesy of Halfdan Helgason Newsletter
http://www.halfdan.is
ARGYLE DISTRICT - GRUND (SPRING 1881)
Everett Parsonage, John Taylor's previous worker in Ontario, canada, lived at Pilot Mound [3]. At this time much of Canada was unsettled except by fur traders for the Hudson Bay Company, Indians and french outposts. Winnipeg was the largest town at that time in 1887 and Sigurdur was the 1st to file a deed for many acres (on file here) in that area. Frelsis (Liberty) Lutheran Church at Grund, NW 12-6-14W, R.M. of Argyle, Manitoba Provincial Heritage Site No. 52, made so with the help of Henry Einarson, was built right next to his homestead named after their Iceland homestead; GRUND, which meant "Grassy Plains" at NW 11-6-14W. Picnic grounds were set up near Sigurdur and Caroline's homestead which still stands today and owned by Sigurdur's son; William Christopherson's offspring. The last name was anglicized. During a meeting of the Icelanders, Sigurdur suggested naming the village closest to them, after a pretty flower. He could not find one and named it after a Pagan God, Baldur. This map shows within 1 mile north or south where the farm is at. Argyle was south of Glenboro, where my mother was from, and North of Baldur. This is a more accurate map from Nonni and Kommakur. The Skjaldbreid Hall was at Grund. Roy has found and posted photo of the Hall. Many events were held there. Sigurdur was also one of the Trustees for Hola (Hills) school south of Grund Church, nestled in a grove of trees, 12. Hernit Christopherson, Sigurdur's brother was a Homeopathic doctor and taught Sunday School at his house, along with three others. Sigurdur Christopherson made a motion to name the congregation Frelsis, seconded by Thorsteinn Antoniusson. Hernit was elected to work with the other trustees and seven others on a committee
[Pg 223, source, 12].

Sigurdur Christopherson
IMG_SCAN_3226_Sigurdur
Poloroid snapshot of a
Portrait of Sigurdur Christopherson
If you know the whereabouts of ANY of the
family portraits, please let Roy know. Thank you!
Courtesy of The Sig & Hank Christopherson Collection [59]

Grund Homestead
3rd Home, 1st Homestead
'Grund' meaning Grassy Plains
Copy of Calendar Ed Fader lent Carrie Humber


Grund
IMG_6562_PHOTO
The mansard roof is visible here.
Sigurdur Christopherson
Farmstead
Courtesy of The Sig & Hank Christopherson Collection [59]
Manitoba experiences large annual temperature ranges: very cold winters and moderately warm summers. The southward sweep of cold, dry arctic and maritime polar air masses in winter is succeeded by mild, humid maritime tropical air in summer. Nearly two-thirds of the precipitation occurs during the 6 summer months, the remainder appearing mostly as snow. The frost-free period varies greatly according to local conditions, but as a general rule the average 100-day frost-free line extends from Flin Flon southeast to the corner of the province. Spring comes first to the Red River valley, which has a frost-free period of about 120 days, and spreads to the north and west. As a result, the mean number of growing degree days (above 5° C) varies from 2000 to 3000 within the limits defined. Snowfall tends to be heaviest in the east and diminishes westward. Around Winnipeg the average snowfall is 126 cm per year. Fortunately, 60% of the annual precipitation accompanies the peak growing period for grains: May, June and July. Late August and early September are dry, favouring the harvest of cereal grains. Source

Four more children were born at Grund over the next few years. Those years were busy ones, their hard work would bring many joys and rewards, but there would be worries and sorrows as well. Sigurdur was on the first town council of Baldur, and it was Carrie who suggested the name for the town [Baldur]. 'Carrie Ave' was named for her. Both took an active part in community life. Their doors were always open to friends and strangers. Many families would stay with them or on Sigurdur's pre-emption (Little Baldur) until they could get their own homes built. One day a prairie fire came racing toward the farmyard. Every hand was needed to fight it. A spot that was burned off was selected and the baby Sigurveig was wrapped in a blanket and left on the spot, while Carrie helped to beat out the fire, then rushed back to find her baby safe. A few years later they lost their nine year old daughter, Lilja, to appendicitis. A longer log house was built, with a lean-to built the full length for the store and post office which they had at Grund. The post office was there until the late 1920's. Sigurdur went to Iceland as an immigration agent. On one of the trips he was gone almost a year. This was an anxious time for Carrie with so much responsibility. When he returned he brought a large party of settlers, many of them his brothers, sisters, young cousins, and his little mother Sigurveig, who although she was blind, was so cheerful and happy to be America. She was interested in the big oak trees, and was delighted when she was taken to the garden and felt the size of the pumpkins and other vegetables. She lived only a short time. In 1893, three weeks after her arrival she passed away at the age of 80. Her funeral was held outdoors. The grounds were crowded with people, many of them just over from Iceland and still wearing their Icelandic shawls and caps. A new house was build in 1896; in 1904 a large barn. Sigurdur continued much "
From the internet added by skitang6 (ancestry.com) on 11 Nov 2007

This is from an Icelandic Calendar (see "1st Homestead" image)
Back Cover: 'Grund' – the Kristófersson family estate near Baldur, Manitoba – circa 1912.
– Built in 1896, five miles north and one and one half miles west of Baldur, ‘Grund’ was the home of Sigurður and Carrie (Taylor) Kristófersson (Christopherson), who were the first Icelandic settlers in ‘Argylebyggð’ (Argyle Municipality) in Southwestern Manitoba. ‘Grund’, erected by carpenter Bæring Hallgrímson, served as the area post office (see sign on photo) until 1932, and the district became known as Grund, as did the nearby church, which is now an historic building. For many years, ‘Grund’ was a focal point for social events, and the ‘Skjaldbreið Hall’ was built nearby....
... Sigurður and Carrie were among the first to seek better land ‘south in Manitoba' in 1881, and Sigurður is regarded as ‘Father’ of the Argyle Settlement. At one time he served as an emigration agent, guiding other Icelanders to Canada, and his pre-emption became known as ‘Little Baldur’ for the fact that many newcomers stayed in the three houses there while getting established. – In 1904, suffering from ill health, Sigurður left ‘Grund’ to his elder son, Jón, and moved to Crescent, British Columbia, where he and Carrie started anew and established a home called ‘Ytra-Nes’ (see October), [pronounced It-tre-ness, according to cousins Carol, Miriam, and Bev]. The photo, taken in 1912 while Sigurður and Carrie (on left) were visiting ‘Grund’, also shows neighhours Árni S. Johnson and George Biles (centre); son and daughter-in-law Will and Stína Christopherson; and their son John (with bicycle), who succeeded to ‘Grund’ (father of Donna Skardal of Baldur).
(Photo and poem courtesy of Donna Skardal).

READ MORE ABOUT ARGYLE DISTRICT




Ox Yoke
IMG_SCAN_0917
Oxe Yoke from the Christopherson Farm newsclipping

Ted & Pauline Christopherson Collection
Land Deed IMG_WEB_0134
One of Sigurdur's Land Deed at Argyle District
Grund Church
Map of Grund Church and surrounding area
Courtesy of Nonni Johnson

LogbergNewspaper/1881, June3 Logberg Ad SigurdurChristopherson_Baldur Source

Sig . Christopherson , BALDUR , MAN. , hefur söluraboð 6. öllu landi Canada Northwest Land Cos . í Suður-Manitoba enn fremur á land i Hudson Bay Cos. og Scotch Ontario Cos.; svo og mikið af spekúlanta-huid i og yrktum bújnrð om . Getur því boðið landkaupendum betri kjör en nokkur annar; borgunar skilmálar nrjög vœgir. Komið beint til hans áður en þjer semjið við aðra. Lánar og peninga með vœgri rentu . Selur og öll jarðyrkju-verkfæri fyrir Massey & C ROUGH TRANSLATION Sig. [Sigurdur] Christopherson , BALDUR , MAN . Has söluraboð 6. whole country Canada Northwest Land Cos . Southern Manitoba Furthermore, the land in Hudson Bay Cos . and Scotch Ontario Cos .; and a lot of spekúlanta - Huida i and plowed bújnrð om . Can offer land buyers better terms than any other ; Borgun terms nrjög vœgir . Come straight to him before Thee negotiate different with others. Loans and money vœgri rent . Sells all agricultural tools for Massey & C

LogbergNewspaper 1893, May 6,
LogbergAd_SigurdurChristopherson, Baldur



LogbergNewspaper, Isafold 4 March 1893 Source
Bad Google Translation:
Dominion-line sent well-equipped ship to Iceland next summer solely to download emigration, so many people ask me or Agent my go along with the line, to such will be performed, and do it in time, and they then brought a volley from Iceland to Liverpool and free way to the disturbance, they always recently have been replaced by the ships and buses in Scotland. Dominion-line has been recognized of Canada Board for sherry expressly good management of emigrants, and now has Board submitted its agent, Mr. B. L. Baldwin's son, who is present on ice country this winter, following the emigrants Court Iniö-line to the next summer, and was be appropriate for the fiesta, is moving Western next summer, be it co travel, that of all emigrants is very well respected and now all Icelanders sit- ugastur trips. Mr. Sigurdur Christopherson from Argyle, umboösmaíy Log Manitoba government, also stays Iceland in winter, will also interpreter and supervisor of some of the people, which carries with Dominion-line next summer. He has received many bezt people in Manitoba to be sherry helpful meðfáð provide the people with him then west, sherry explicitly good supplies and work. / Also I expect to go Western ones next summer. Be aware, þjer emigration, to no other line but Dominion-line offers you as good navigation west and those þjer give those masters Baldwin Sigurd. They are also the main agents Canada- Manitoba and management for west, to guide tourists when there is, and there are people sit- Ugas. It is all better served with them go.
I want to ask all those who want go west next summer and plan to sherry take a ride with Dominion - line, to let me or my Agent know what soon as possible. Those who want to get a reliable and proves uppiýsingar viðvíkjundi move west , and therefore , what they are most conveniently moving with sherry , and what they need to casteration the way o. al., can get them in the aforementioned masters, Baldwin and Sigurd and signed . Vopnafirði January 20, 1893 . Sveinn Brynjolfsson

Landneminn - 1. October 1891 1. árgangur 1891-1894, 2.-3. tölublað
Sounds like Sigurdur & Kristjan put ad in paper to show property in Melita, MB, Canada using railway.
 
Bad GoogleTranslation
Enn cin íslensk nýlenda.
Mr. Sigurður Ohristopherson frá Grund í Argyle og Mr. Kristján Abrahamsson

úr Víðirnesbyggð í Nýja-íslandi hafa verið að skoða land með fram Souris-greininni af Canada Pacific jámbrautinni, sem nú er verið að leggja frá Brandon suðvestur í Souris kolanáma. Það er nú búið að járnlesgja Sourisgreinina frá Brandon til Melita, sem er járnbrautarstöð á vestur-bakka Sourisárinnar, og er vegalengdin þangað frá Brandon um 70 mílur. Frá Melita er búið að undirbúa brautarstæðið um 30 mílur vestur, og verður byrjað að járnleggja þann kafla strax og brúin yflr Souris-ána hjá Melita er fullger, sem búist er við að verði að viku liðinni. Landið, sem þeir S. Christopherson og Kr. Abrahamsson voru að skoða, er um 15 mílur norðvestur frá Melita, og um 10 míl- ur fyrir norðan þessa járnbraut, sem verið er að byggja yestur til kolanámanna. Kr. Abrahamsson og ýmsir fleiri íslendingar eru þegar bunir að skrifa sig fyrir landi á þeBsu svæði í township 6, röð 29 fyrir vestan aðal-hádegisbauginn. Landsvæði þetta kvað vera öldumyndað, gott akuryrkjuland, einnig talsvert slægju- land á fleBtum sectionarfjðrðungum. Nokkrir lækir rennaigegn um þetta svæði, suðaustur i Sourisána, og allstaðar er hægt að fá gott brunnvatn með því að grafa frá 12—20 fet eptir því. Hvergi er alkalí í þessu landi, og allstaðar heygott, og kvað landið í heild sinni vera einkar vel fallið til akuryrkju ogkvik- fjárræktar til samans (mixed farming). Allstaðar eru engi þur og þó vel grasgefin. — Hið eina sem virðist vanta er skðgur, og er ekki timbur að fá nær en um 20 milur, og verða menn því annaðhvort að sækja timbur þessa leið, kaupa aðfluttan sagaðan við, eða byggja úr torfi eins og sumir innlendir bændur þar í nánd hafa þegar gjört. Góð byggð er komin á alla vegu, en þetta svæðí hefir orðið eptir, vegna fjarlægðar frá jarnbrautum; nú er verið að rífa upp land með fram þessari nýju braut. Á þessu svæði eru enn ónumin um 6 township, sem allt er svipað land að gæðum, og er hjer tækifæri að koma a föt stórri og góðri íslenskri byggð, ef menn að eins bregða strax við áður en annara þjðða menn ná í landið. Til Souris kolanámanna er vega- lengdin að eins um 70 mílur, svo nðg ódýrt eldsneyti verðurað fá strax í haust þegar brautin er fullgjörð þangað. Ennfremur eru kolanámur suðaustur við Turtle Mountains, um 25 mílur frá Melita, og sækja nti sumir kol þangað úr Melíta byggðinni, sem er 6 ára gönml. Þessi nýja íslendinga byggð er um 70 mílur beint í vestur PG 10, Column 2, paragraph 2 Source

frá Argyle-byggðinni, og rjett innan við vestur takmörk Mani- toba fylkisins. Mr. Christopherson, sem nú heflr aðsetur í Melíta að mestu, gerir allt sem hann getur til að greiða fyrir þeim, sem ætla að nema land á nefndu svæði, með því að leiðbeina þeim til landa, útvega þeim, er landið vilja skoða, mikið niður sett eða fritt far með járnbraut fra Winnipeg og til baka, og niðursett far og flutnings-gjald fyrir þá sem land nema i pessari nýju íslendinga byggð. (Heimskringla). PG 11 Source
Landneminn - 1. October 1891 1. árgangur 1891-1894, 2.-3. tölublað
  Still cin Icelandic colony.
Mr. Sigurdur Ohristopherson from Grund in Argyle and Mr. Kristján Abrahamsson [perhaps Kristjan Abrahamson & Jakobina Ketilsdottir 1891, Reynistadur ]
from Víðirnesbyggð in New Iceland have been exploring land with the Souris Branch of Canada Pacific jámbrautinni which is now being submitted from Brandon southwest of Souris coal mining . It's now been járnlesgja Sourisgreinina from Brandon to Melita , a railway station on the western bank of the river Souris- , and the distance there from Brandon 70 mi . From Melita been preparing broke deepened about 30 miles west, and will begin to lay the iron section immediately after the bridge over Souris River at Melita is Completed , which is expected to be next week . Country , they S. Christopherson and Kr . Abraham 's son was to see , is about 15 miles northwest of Melita , and 10 intergovernmental ur north of this railway , which is being built yestur to mine . Kr. Abrahamsson and various other Icelanders are already prepared to subscribe country þeBsu area in township 6, series 29 west main hádegisbauginn. Territory it claimed to be the wave form, good crop land, also considerably slægjuland flestum sectionarfjðrðungum. Several streams flow through this area, southeast in the Souris River, and everywhere you can get a good well water by digging from 12-20 feet after that. Nowhere is alkaline in this country, and everywhere heygott, and said the country as a whole to be particularly well-suited to agriculture ogkvik- equity culture combined (mixed farming). Everywhere there are no dry grass and although well made. - The only thing that seems to be lacking is skðgur, and non-timber to get closer than 20 miles, and one must therefore either download wood this way, immigrants buy sawn with, or build the turf as well as some domestic farmers where near having when done. Good built back on all sides, but this area has been left behind, because of the distance from the train tracks; now being tear up land with the this new path. In this area there are still Onuma 6 township, all of which is similar to land quality, and Hjerl opportunity to establish a large and good Icelandic settlement, if men like break immediately before the other þjðða men reach the country. To Souris is mine road length of just 70 miles, so nðg cheap fuel verðurað immediately get in the autumn when the bus is full made there. Furthermore, coal mines south of Turtle Mountains, about 25 miles from Melita and download nti some coal there from Melilla regions, which is 6 years gönml. This new Icelanders built about 70 miles directly west

from Argyle - regions, and Interests in the west limit Mani- toba array. Mr. Christopherson , as now planes based in Melilla large, does everything he can to pay for those who intend to land in a region , by guiding them to the country, providing them , the country will see , much reduced or peaceful ride by rail from Winnipeg and back , and set down far and shipping fee for those settlers in Pessina new Icelanders built. ( Heimskringla )

Map of Meilta, Manitoba showing distance to New Iceland *Gimli)

1899 in Heimskringla July 27, 1899, there is an article about Sigurdur in Icelandic which cannot be translated at all by Google! It appears he is noted as a man of honor, yet he is calling someone to the carpet, or the oother way around. Mentions Swan River.
"...explanation much sooner , in respect hr . Christopherson , and that we would do it Iiefði sent us its complaint sooner"....
Column 3
http://timarit.is/files/10730509.pdf#navpanes=1&view=FitH&search=%22Christopherson%22

Search for more articles in the Icelandic Newspapers Tímarit.is

Sigurdur and family
SCAN0075
Sigurdur & Caroline TAYLOR Christopherson,
and their daughters, Susie and Veiga

Courtesy of The Donna - Lauren & Gordon
Skardal and Donalee
Collection
Haldor, William and John
SCAN0189_Stitch_SCAN
Haldor, William Christopher, and John Christopherson
Sigurdur & Caroline TAYLOR Christopherson sons

Courtesy of The Donna - Lauren & Gordon
Skardal and Donalee
Collection
William Christopherson
SCAN0164
William Christopher Christopherson stayed in
Grund, Argyle District and bought the farmstead

Courtesy of The Donna - Lauren & Gordon
Skardal and Donalee
Collection

Logberg Newspaper 1901 NOV 14 Logberg

Logberg Newspaper Logberg Aug19.1893

ARGYLE DISTRICT - GRUND POST OFFICE

Grund Postmark IMG_SCAN_2358
Grund Post Mark AUG 17 1907
Post the history of the Post Office - Pending... The Post Office was at Grund until the late 20's., [12] EST. DEC 1, 1883. Closed 1931., [33]
"A post office was established in his home on July 1, 1878, ‘Húsavík’ S. of Gimli" (see Argyle Dist. above)
Erla's memories: I also think Donna [Skardal] did tell me that the Post Office was at the House until they built the little building which was just down the hill, from the house a little ways, in the trees/bushes.To the left, when walking UP to the house.(or to the right when standing at the house and looking down the driveway). Donna and I [Erla] used to occasionally play "store" in the building when we were quite young. I don't remember it being in 'great' shape, but we occasionally went in it.
Update: View Horseshoe imprint over the door, possibly Geysir's? Same knot in #2183 in 2251
Drawing of the Grund Post Office
IMG_2183
Grund Post Office at the R.M. of Argyle District , MB, Canada
Hanging in the Frelsis Church
Drawing by Donna Skardal
Possibly Grund Post Office
IMG_SCAN_2251
Possibly the Grund Post Office at the R.M.
of Argyle District
, MB, Canada
Courtesy of The Sig & Hank
Christopherson Collection
Possibly Bob by Grund Post Office
IMG_SCAN_2251
Closeup of left photo. Possibly Robert
Christopherson, son of Ted and shotgun

Courtesy of The Sig & Hank
Christopherson Collection
1874
IMG_NEG_1874
Ted and Robert Duck Hunting
There are 5 Negs, only two came out. Others are possibly the trip up across the Great Divide, as seen in Robert's Album. He is wearing different clothing here.

Courtesy of The Ted
Christopherson Collection

Grund Post Office Mail Sorter, Courtesy of Baldur Museum. Photo by Diane Thornquist

SIGURDUR - CANADIAN IMMIGRATION AGENT - ICELAND TO CANADA

(1890)
Sigurdur
Image 3211c
"Grandpa Sigurdur with the Moon Mullens Hat
maybe on his last trip to Iceland abt. 1897."
Trip Down the ST. Lawrence
(BACK)
Courtesy of The Sig & Hank Christopherson Collection [59]

2211 Back
Image 3211c
"Grandpa Sigurdur with the Moon Mullens Hat
maybe on his last trip to Iceland abt. 1897."

Courtesy of The Sig & Hank Christopherson Collection [59]

History of the lcelandic Settlements At the Narrows, Manitoba by Geirfinnur Peterson
In the winter of 1893 an agent for the Canadian government came to our part of Iceland to try to encourage immigration of Icelanders to Canada. This agent, Sigurdur Christopherson, had been born in the same settlement and had  gone to Canada some eighteen years  earlier. He...Read more.
Source: http://timarit.is/view_page_init.jsp?pageId=2230227

PDF_WEB_0016_Christopherson-1 (from Kormakur Hognason)
Sigurdur went to Iceland as an immigration agent. On one of he trips he was gone almost a year.
When he returned he brought a large party of settlers, many of them his brothers, sisters, young cousins, and his mother Sigurveig to be America.

Lögberg-Heimskringla
The first decade brought a steady flow of settlers, some from New Iceland, some directly from Iceland, and others from non-Icelandic settlements in Ontario. Within ten years the district settled. Sigurdur Christopherson was very influential in stimulating immigration from Iceland, and he made several trips as a Canadian immigration agent, encouraging his compatriots to come to the land which he loved and in which he had so much faith. Many immigrants took his advice, but that is not to say that he was welcome in Iceland. On more than one occasion he was almost thrown into jail by Icelandic authorities who resented his attempts to lure the Icelandic people from their mother country. But many followed him, and by 1890, there were about 700 Icelanders in the Argyle district. Some had been neighbours in New Iceland and in Iceland as well. Both moves were made from areas where conditions had been the most difficult. At last their efforts were rewarded, for the settlement in Argyle prospered. As early as 1884, Skafti Arason was able to report on behalf [Continued on Page 7] of the settlement: We have 650 cultivated acres, 260 head of cattle, 62 oxen, 70 pigs, 60 sheep, 9 work horses, 2 ponies, 2 colts, 6 mowers, 6 harnesses, 3 reapers, 2 binders, 1 threshing machine, 13 wagons, 23 ploughs, and 12 harrows. [Read about First Icealndic Pony] The settlers wasted no time in organizing community life. There were six schools in operation before 1900. In 1885, a Ladies' Aid was organized, which was very successful in fundraising for the church. In 1893, a lending library was established. As early as 1884, a club was formed for the moral uplift of the community. The rules of this club were abstention from alcohol and profane language, as well as abstention from smoking for all those who had not already acquired the habit before joining the club.
Source: http://timarit.is/view_page_init.jsp?pageId=2236907&lang=i

According to the Icelandic newspapers he arrived on Iceland 25th of March 1900 together with his son., [49]

From the book Wasteland with Words: A Social History of Iceland By Sigurður Gylfi Magnússon,
Paragraph 3, pp 79, Baldvin Baldvinsson, Sigurdur, his daughter's father-in-law; Sven faced opposition to people leaving Iceland from an Editor. On March 8 at the GoodTemplers House, they were overtaken with noise, whistling. Baldvi n Baldvinsson fræðir oss um það', að frjett sú sem getið va r u m í síðast a blaði , að stæð i í Frer Prr.ii>, að en n liaf i spurz t ti l ein s íslenzk s vest - urfarahóps , sj e eingöng u bygg ð á mis - skilning i einhverr a hjerlendr a blaða-manna . Sá hópur , sem Free Preusegir að von sje á , kom einmit t hinga ð u m næstsíðust u holgi


SIGURDUR - FATHER OF BALDUR, MANITOBA, CANADA

1890
If it was possible for Roy to sit at a table with his Great Grandfather, Sigurdur Christopherson, and understand him fluently speaking in Icelandic, Roy believes Sigurdur would be the first one to say 'do not boast about ones family'. Sigurdur was a shaker and a mover his whole life. Roy has only seen direct writings of Sigurdur posted in the paper ad below. Up until FEB. of 2013, Roy has only seen Sigurdur mentioned in books that Sigurdur was instrumental in the formation of Baldur, including naming it.

In his wife's own handwriting, Roy's Great Grandmother, Caroline TAYLOR Christopherson, transcribed by Ryan Eyford, Caroline writes on Mar. 28th 1890;
"We are getting quite well supplied with Railroads. There is one to the north of us with a station 9 miles distant. Another to the south with a station only five miles distant. The latter runs from Morris on the Red River to Brandon. It is not completed all the way to Brandon yet but the trains are running. We expect a town to be laid out on that line just five miles south of here, which Sigurdur is the founder. He is going to name it Baldur. We expect it will be surveyed in a few days then Sigurdur is going to build a Real Estate office there. We have sold out our store at Grund and now we have only the Post Office. It makes a great deal less work for me. I was getting very tired of the store and with two RRs so near it could not be profitable here. We may in time when the boys are a little older start business at Baldur.", [33]

Now this could be boastful talk to a sister, except Caroline 'Carrie' Christopherson is very matter of fact within all her letters, Roy has seen. It has been written in books and posted online how Sigurdur was "involved" with Baldur. Sigurdur gave a great deal of himself, so much so, that it took it's toll towards the end of his life, as stated in his Eulogy.
Visit the new Baldur page here.
SIGURDUR - CANADIAN AGENT IN ICELAND - 1893
  In the winter of 1893 an agent for the Canadian gov- ernment came to our part of Iceland to try to encourage immigration of Icelanders to Canada. This agent, Sigurdur Christopherson, h a d b e e n born in the same settlement and had gone to Canada some eighteen years earlier.

SIGURDUR - FATHER OF SWAN RIVER VALLEY, MB

(MAY 27, 1897)
From Nonni Jonssons WebSite (Swan River)
Nonni considers Sigurdur "the Father of Swan River Valley" for bringing in people.
The Swan River Valley is located in north-western Manitoba, Canada, close to Saskatchewan, about 300 miles north-west of Winnipeg. Like all the other valleys on the great prairies of central North America, this valley is merely lower flatland along the rivers limited on two sides by hills formed in the gradually rising landscape. Deep valleys are non-existent except where there are high mountains, and therefore there are no actual valleys on the vast prairies, but rather wide depressions along riverbeds. The Swan River Valley lies between the Duck Mountains to the south and the Porcupine Mountains to the north; while Thunder Hill stands like a gable on its west side. All these hills are low, they are the first stage in the rising landscape from western Manitoba to the Rocky Mountains. Although the hills are low they add a sorely needed diversity to the lowest and flattest areas in Manitoba.

"Around 1898 many Icelandic families were living in the Argyle district, some were recent arrivals from Iceland who were unable to obtain land because most of the homestead lands were already taken and the price of available land was too high. These people were eager to find farmland to move to, and they were working on several plans. Sigurður Christophersson, farmer at Grund in the Argyle district, had been much involved with matters of immigration. In the summer of 1897 he travelled to the Swan River Valley to take a look at the land available there. When he returned he praised the quality of the land and encouraged landless Icelanders to move there. His reports may be read in the Icelandic newspaper Lögberg. (You will have to install a DjVu plugin). 24 June 1897 page 1 and 29 July 1897 page 8. Or in English here. In the winter of 1897-1898 a meeting was held at the home of Skapti Arason, a farmer in the Argyle district, to discuss moving to the Swan River Valley. Sigurður Christophersson was asked to make another trip to the valley to inquire about land for a few families. While he was there he made arrangements for A. J. Vopni´s quarter."
From the Swan River Valley webpage by Nonni Jonsson [24]

Here are the two Newspaper Ads placed by Sigurdur and without Komakur's tanslation would probably be unknown in this day and age. From the Icelandic Newspaper Lögberg 24 June, 1897, page 1
translated by Kormákur Högnason (Kormakur Hognason)

Swan River Valley
On 27. May we left from Winnipeg in order to survey land in the northern part of Dauphin county and in the Swan River valley, which lies from north east to south west between Duck Mountain and the Porcupine Mountain. From the town of Dauphin we drove (by buckboard) north through

Page 10 of 14 Tuesday, September 08, 2009 7:45:28 PM
east to south west between Duck Mountain and the Porcupine Mountain. From the town of Dauphin we drove (by buckboard) north through Dauphin county to Sifton, but from there we rode (by horse) north to Pine River and west into the Swan River valley. In Dauphin county we didn't see any unsettled land, that we really liked, the land generally lies low and is also in many areas sandy and rocky and forested. We don´t mean to imply that there is no good land in Dauphin county, but to state that the good land is almost all claimed and we wish that Icelanders had gotten their share of it.
The Swan River valley is completely unsettled at present, and the main reason, first and foremost is that the land has not been surveyed and furthermore it has until now been located very far from a railroad; but now neither element is a deterrant and it can be taken for granted that, the entire valley will be settled within a short time.
When we arrived two miles west of the northern corner of Duck Mountain the land began to look prettier, there we walked on beautiful prairies surrounded by forest. Four miles from the mountain we arrived at very beautiful prairies, they are so well shaped for field cultivation (agriculture) that we had no complaint to make. There are also the finest fields and pastures and beautiful forested tracks along rivers and streams. What we surveyed the most were township 36 and 37, R.26 and 28, and there, where we traveled, the thickest forest was on the south-east side of the river (Swan River). That river is about 200 feet wide, where we travelled along side it and the river banks are close to 100 feet high. We arrived at three other rivers, whose names we didn’t know but there are beautiful forested tracts growing along side them. There is therefore plenty of good wood in the valley for building houses, for firewood, fence making, etc. The soil is good everywhere, black soil, 7 to 18 inches deep and below there is brown clay.
There is a lake in the northern part of the valley called Swan Lake and we were told that it is full of fish, and that is true, because there is fish in every river. There is plenty of good water everywhere, the water is clear in the rivers and we also found spring water in a few places. There is a large number of elk and moose in the mountains on both sides of the valley. This valley lies 35 miles to the west of Lake Winnipegosis and 70 miles from the end of the Dauphin railroad; but there is little doubt that this railroad will be lengthened in the near future, and then it will reach across the valley.
Presently there is no driveable road north to the Swan River valley, but the government has determined the road location and we hope that this road will be constructed this summer. We expect a more detailed assessment of this area to appear in Lögberg within a month; but this brief survey should nevertheless be sufficient to show Icelanders that this is a good opportunity - perhaps the best opportunity ever to present itself in the future of this country - to obtain a good farm in a good community.
Finally we want to repeat again, and we hope that men take notice, that this valley will be densely built within a few months after the land has been surveyed. Icelanders will therefore not obtain this land unless they react right now.

Page 11 of 14 Tuesday, September 08, 2009 7:45:28 PM
right now.

Located in Winnipeg 23. June 1897.
S. Christopherson
Þ. Símonarson.

From the Icelandic Newspaper Lögberg, 29 July, 1897, page 8
Swan River Valley
As was mentioned in the issue of Lögberg, published on the 1st of this month, we left Winnipeg on 26. June to survey land in Swan River valley. We travelled on the Manitoba & North Western railroad west to Yorkton and from there we drove (by buckboard) north east to the valley. The road from Yorkton to Fort Pelly, nearly 50 miles, is especially good, but it is in many places difficult to travel the nearly 75 miles from Fort Pelly northeast to Swan Lake. Not even minor road repair has been performed in that region (the Pelly Trail) and yet there has been a considerable traffic over many years, both by Indians and the white men (Fur traders) who have conducted trade with them. We had small horses (Indian ponies) during the journey, and when we arrived in the north we rode through the valley. This valley lies southwest from a fairly large and attractive fishing lake, called Swan Lake (Álptavatn), it is about 30 to 40 miles wide and approximately the same length. Two separate mountains lie on either side of the valley, Duck Mountain (Andafjall) on the southeast side and Porcupine Mountain (Broddgaltafjall) on the northwest side, the former is 2500 feet and the latter is 2400 feet above sea level. The bottom of the valley forms a 1900 feet high plateau, called Thunder Hill (Þrumuhæð). All of these mountains are covered by a forest, that in many places has very tall trees. Two large and attractive rivers run along the entire valley and into Swan Lake, the one in the west is Woody River and the one in the east is Swan River. Many creeks and brooks run down the mountains and into the two main rivers. We soon realized that we would not be able to travel across the entire valley at this time and since it did not escape our notice that the south-eastern part lends itself better to developing a community we decided to pay less attention to the north-west part. We carefully surveyed the land area between Woody River and Swan River, from Thunder Hill all the way down to the lake and a large part of the land that lies between Swan River and Duck Mountain; all in all we covered 17 townships. Between Woody River and Swan River are many exceptional grassy sloughs, in particular toward the north and near the lake. These sloughs were in many places wet, partly due to the fact that the grass plexus is so dense that the water can’t escape, nor can the sun dry it, furthermore there was nearly constant rain during the time we were traveling there. Our guide said, that all these fields are usually dry during the latter part of the summer. The grass was everywhere superb in both growth and quality. The land along the north-western side of Swan River is very attractive for field tilling, it lies high and is dry, and the soil is good - the soil is in general good everywhere we went with the exception of two or three patches that were sandy. In some places the sides of the rivers are covered in forest but in most places this is just new growth, that requires little effort to remove, and some places are completely devoid of forest. There is however plenty

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in most places this is just new growth, that requires little effort to remove, and some places are completely devoid of forest. There is however plenty of good woodland further away from the river, so nobody needs to fear a lack of sufficient and good wood. We were especially pleased with this land for field tilling and for livestock (mixed farming), because those who will be fortunate enough to acquire the land along the river will be able to use the fields that lie further away for many years. In township 35, range 29 a large creek, called Thunder Hill Creek; runs into Swan River, along side this creek is a very attractive and good land suitable for any purpose, the pastures there are exceptionally attractive. The most attractive place that we saw during our journey was undoubtedly between Rolling River (Roaring River) and Duck Mountain. There is a hill just west of the mountain, called Minitonas Hill, it lies 1500 feet above sea level, and Rolling River (Roaring River) runs along the west side of the hill and Favel River runs along the east side of it. The land around this hill and down along the rivers is of good quality and particularly attractive. The entire area has obviously been covered by forest until recently, but the wood has been completely destroyed by fire over a large region. This region may be described as a single savanna, high and dry, with small but attractive forest belts along the rivers. In our opinion the pastures in this region are scarcely sufficient should the land be used exclusively for livestock, however they are well suited for field tilling or both together (mixed farming). We met land surveyors at Minitonas Hill. The man in charge stated that he had never in his life surveyed a more attractive land, and quite honestly we don’t doubt that he was telling the truth. There is plenty of wood in the entire valley and in some places the saw wood is so good that a sawmill would be well viable. The most common trees are poplar and spruce. But we did see tamarack and birch in a few places and along Swan River there was a considerable number of maple trees.
There is plenty of good water everywhere. All the rivers and creeks have a sand bottom and the water is therefore clean and clear. We found many ice cold and silver clear springs.
Fishing is in all the rivers and abundant whitefish catch in the lake, as would be expected since a navigable river runs out of it north to Lake Winnipegosis. That river is called Shoal River and it is only 14 miles long. At present it is costly and difficult to move west to Swan River valley, however it is not nearly as difficult as some would think. As we already stated there is an excellent road from Yorkton to Fort Pelly and from there it’s only an additional 30 to 40 miles to the location that we liked the best, and the road is quite useable during this time of year. The Government of Manitoba has decided to clear a roadway, this Fall, west of Dauphin and into the valley, all the difficulties involved in getting there will therefore disappear by next summer. However, if Icelanders are to acquire these land areas, they cannot wait for this roadway, they must react immediately and secure the land. Hon. Thos. Greenway has made attempts to have a few townships in the Swan River valley set aside for Icelanders, but that will apparently not go through. The most that Hon. Clifford Sifton has done, in this matter, is to permit those Icelanders who wish to be absent from their land longer than the law stipulates in order to earn money, this prerequisite may turn out to be of considerable value. In conclusion we want to stress that we liked the land so much that we don’t hesitate to urge Icelanders to react immediately and acquire land there. If a few band together and go as a group, then the Government of Manitoba will undoubtedly provide them with a guide and offer them a subsidized fare on the Manitoba & North Western railroad. The undersigned are willing to answer letters and supply all relevant information.

Winnipeg 26. July 1897.
M. Paulson, S. Christopherson,
618 Elgin ave, Grund
Winnipeg. Man.
[END NEWSPAPER ADS]

There is an article regarding money matters

Swan River Valley
Canada Pamphlet 1913 no.006

Text
Canada Pamphlet 1913 no.006

Sheep
Sheep Ranch, Swan River District
Canada Pamphlet 1913 no.006

0175
Elk in meadow
source

Working on Map of the area
Based on URL from Nonni Jonsson
UNDER CONSTRUCTION














 
Buckboard Example
Example of a Buckboard
Courtesy of Nonni Jonsson

l
Swan River Roundup
Courtesy of Nonni Jonsson


 

SWAN RIVER PROJECT
Nonni Jonsson is supplying Roy with lots of local history near him regarding Swan River Valley. Due to the amount of things Roy is working on, all data will be posted here and reformatted when possible.
One goal is to do a map(s) of Sigurdur´s trip into Swan River Valley.
Another is a timeline based on letters and other historical events.
Plus photos representing what Sigurdur might had to do to make this trip possible. No, there are no photos of Sigurdur rounding the base of the mountain and looking into the valley. Hmm, good idea for a painting if Roy ever retires.

No, newer photos will be used.

One leg of the trip mentioned a Buckboard.

 

 

 

 


Hello Roy
It says that Sigurdur used small horses when he came in from Yorkton.
This is a picture from the Swan River Roundup, and these horses are probably the same type. They are small, sometimes called Indian ponies or just called race horses here. They used to race with full size horses and full size chuckwagons, but now they use small chuckwagons and these small horses. They are small wirey bad tempered and did not get swamp fever. The first pioneers here went straight to swamp grass areas because often they were the only open areas, although Swan River did have some open plains with real grass. Early work horses died quickly from swamp fever and so many early settlers used oxen for travel and plowing instead.

Roy hopes to complete this section with Nonni's help in the future. Just so many hours in a day.
Due to work (delay started Mar 2013), and recently the Cousins Tour 2014, and a move to Washington state, this project was delayed. Now ready to resume.

Frelsis Church Grund By Roy Einar Christopherson
Courtesy of Roy Einar Christopherson

Grund Church Photo
Grund Church
Book Source is J.D. McFarland, Historic Resources Branches


Grund Church Wedding
Wedding at Grund Church in the Argyle District of Manitoba, of Theadore Evan and Pauline Einarson Christopherson

Grund Wedding Inside
Right: Arni Sveinsson, Ted, Pauline, Emily Enns (Pauline's sister), carol Palmeson (cousin), Brides father, Gudbrandur Einarson.


 

GRUND CHURCH

(1889)
Frelsis Lutheran Church (Grund) Completed in June of 1889, Grund is the oldest surviving Icelandic Lutheran church in Canada and a designated Provincial historic site. It is located between the villages of Baldur and Glenboro, approximately 180 kilometers southwest of Winnipeg. The pioneers who built the church had originally
settled in the short-lived "State of New Iceland" on the western shore of Lake Winnipeg. Battered by outbreaks of scurvy and smallpox, and facing shortages of food and shelter, some of them began looking elsewhere for a new and less hostile home. In August of 1880 one of their leaders, Sigurdur Kristofersson (later anglicized as Christopherson), traveled to the region north of Pilot Mound and registered the first homestead on a piece of land which he called Grund (Grassy Plain). Guided by John Taylor, an English missionary and brother-in-law of Christopherson, the first settlers left Gimli on March 15, 1881 and reached their destination on March 31. Upon arrival they congregated in the vicinity of Christopherson's farm. It was near this spot that the church was built eight years later. Initially religious services were held in private homes or recently built schools, but soon the pressure of a burgeoning population forced the settlers to organize on a more formal basis. Two distinct congregations were established: the "Frikirkja" on January 1, 1884, and the "Frelsis" on July 25, 1885. Work on the new church, intended to be used by both congregations, began in 1889 on a two-acre piece of land purchased from one of the settlers for $10.00. All the labour was performed by volunteers

Page 6 of 14 Tuesday, September 08, 2009 7:45:28 PM
congregations, began in 1889 on a two-acre piece of land purchased from one of the settlers for $10.00. All the labour was performed by volunteers under the direction of carpenters Byring Hallgrimson and Arni Sveinson. In 1896 a steepled belfry was added to the structure to accommodate a newly acquired 230-kilogram bell. The organ, still in working order and originally standing on a platform against the east wall, was purchased in 1911. Several outbuildings, including a stable and a home for the minister, were
built shortly after the completion of the church, but were torn down in the 1930s and 1940s. A small cemetery, serving as final resting place for some of the original pioneers, is located some three hundred metres to the east.
For many years Grund served the members of both the Frelsis and Frikirkja congregations, but in 1910 another church was built at Bru, a few kilometers northeast of Grund, to service the needs of those living in the eastern part of the settlement. This church was best known for its stained glass windows and fine organ. Four years earlier a third congregation, the Emmanuel Lutheran, had been formed in Baldur and in 1907 its members built the Baldur Emmanuel Lutheran Church. With the construction of these two structures, and the serious rural depopulation that coincided with the depression and the dust bowl of the 1930s, the membership at Grund began to decline. In 1965 the Frelsis congregation merged with that of the Emmanuel Church. Nine years later Grund was declared a provincial historic site and maintenance of the property was turned over to the Manitoba government. Unfortunately, the survival of Grund came at the expense of Bru, which was eventually moved to Cypress River where it now serves as a restaurant.

Directions to the Church (Roy has a map):
From the junction of Elizabeth Street (Highway 23) and Oak Creek Road in Baldur drive north on Oak Creek Road for approximately 9.2 km. Located on the right-hand side of the road, the church is hard to miss. Almost all of the route is over a gravel road. While driving through town you will pass the Emmanuel Lutheran Church on the left. The excursion will take you through an area of scenic hills and pothole lakes created during the most recent period of glaciation.

1. Thanks to Nonni Jonsson, with special thanks to Gordon Goldsborough, we now have a pinpoint location for five places of historical significance in Canada, that being;
1a. Carrie Street in Baldur named after Caroline nee Taylor Christopherson whom married Sigurdur. Look at Street sign,

1b. Grund homestead of Sigurdur and Caroline [see 1, 2], and 1.c. Grund Cemetery where the Christopherson and many Icelanders rest.

1d. The Frelsis (Liberty) Lutheran Church at Grund which they helped build and attended, and where Roy's parents were wed. Also see 1, 2, 3. The Lighting Globes (orig. Gas) were donated by Gudny Aradottir. A google map tour of Sigurdur's migration is underway.
On Caroline Taylors page, it shows Frelsis actually meant 'Absolute Independence', not Liberty.

1e. This church is the Immanuel Lutheran Church on Carrie St. in Baldur. Sigurjon Kristofferson was one of the early trustees.

Two other Lutheran churches in Manitoba are worth a visit.

1. Bethany Lutheran, located approximately 3.2 km north of the junction of Highways 10 and 45 and approximately 1 km east.
2. Hecla Lutheran in Hecla Village on the shore of Lake Winnipeg.

Further Information:
Come into Our Heritage, Baldur, Rural Municipality of Argyle, 1981.

From: Ed Fader
Subject: Grund Church Booklet We have a 18-page booklet with history of Grund Lutheran Church with detailed text and pictures put out by Manitoba Culture, Heritage and Recreation to celebrate 100 years 1889-1989. Enclosed is a picture from this booklet. Not a clear picture. Sigurdur Christopherson, wife Caroline (nee Taylor) and Family: John, Sigurveig, William, Halldor, Kjartan, Sigurdur, Lily, Caroline, Susan Suggestions for further reading from that booklet: Many comprehensive secondary sources are available to the general reader interested in the history of the Icelandic people in Canada. For a general overview see W. J. Lindal's The Icelanders in Canada, (Ottawa: Canada Ethnic Press Federation, 1967). For full and engrossing accounts of Icelandic settlement in Manitoba, see W. Kristjanson's The Icelandic People in Manitoba, A Manitoba Saga, (Winnipeg: Wallingford Press, 1965), and Dr. Steinn Thompson's Riverton and the Icelandic Settlement, (Riverton: Thordis Thompson, 1976). Numerous historical articles on early Icelandic settlement, social and cultural life may be found in The Icelandic Canadian, published quarterley, by the Icelandic Canadian, Winnipeg, Manitoba


"...Borga and Byring are living in Glenboro. The Icelanders expect to start in a short time (just as soon as the weather permits) to build their new church. I will be in about the center of the settlement about one mile east of here. 102 They intend to have only the one for the settlement and I expect it will be quite a large one. ..." page 26, [33]

READ MORE ABOUT GRUND CHURCH

Wedding of Ted and Pauline at Grund Church MB
Arni Sveinson, Theodore Christopherson (Groom), Pauline Einarson (Bride), Emily Einarson Enns, Carol Palmason Kristjansson,
Gudbrandur Einarson, (Father of the Bride)
Grund Church
IMG_SCAN_3397
Roy at Frelsis (Liberty) Lutheran Church
at Grund, Argyle District, MB
AUG 2013
The exact spot his parents stood 70 years earlier. All thanks to Mike

Courtesy of The Hank Christopherson Collection

Grund Sunday School
Click to Enlarge

Grund Sunday School 1896
Courtesy of The Jonasson Family & The District of Argyle



You see, Sigurdur's health was not that good. He found when he visited the coast of British Columbia, Canada, his lungs were better and around 1912 [1904] they moved and built- a small cabin there which the larger house was attached to it. The street they lived on was named after them (Christopherson Road) and shows on the map to this day.

Page 5 of 14 Tuesday, September 08, 2009 7:45:28 PM
from Iceland and still wearing their Icelandic shawls and caps. A new house was build in 1896; in 1904 a large barn. Sigurdur continued much colonization work, making more trips back to Iceland, and also some into the Swan River area of Manitoba. He had also built up a real estate and insurance business, with Carrie working as his secretary, well able to carry on his business when he was away. In 1903, Sigurdur was finally struck down by ill health and was confined to bed for months. The following winter he suffered a relaps, so on his doctor's advice, he and Carrie traveled to the west coast. She never thought that she was leaving her home for good and would be called a 'pioneer' once more, but that's exactly what happened. On a previous trip, Sigurdur had bought a piece of land on the seaside. One day when the west coast climate had made him stronger, they walked up to this property, a beauty spot with overgrown orchard, they fell in love with it. Sigurdur began clearing the brush and soon had a site cleared for a small house. They named it 'Itriness', the name of his parents' farm in Iceland. As at Grund, their doors were always open. Many old friends stopped for a visit; new friends and neighbors never failed to call if passing by; some of their children moved west to live near them and so they spent their last years happily at Itriness. Sigurdur died on Easter Day, March 27, 1921. He is buried in Grund Cemetery in Argyle Municipality.
Read the entire Christopherson Family History in an Excerpt from Come inoto our Heritage Book.

Ocean Parker, September, 2000 Special Heritage Edition
Ytra-Nes, meaning Outer Ness was a 90-acre waterfront estate bought in 1904
by Sigurdur Kristofersson from Iceland. Located near Crescent, the land had been previously owned by a Scotsman and was the site of an ancient Indian fort (mound). The property also had fruit and walnut trees. Over the years, Icelandic neighbours established themselves nearby, including the Sveinn, Brynjolfsson, Kristjan, Runolfur, Anderson, Bjornson and Stoneson families.
In 1912, Ytra-Nes became the home of son and daughter-in-law John and Vala Christopherson and the new home, built prior to 1907, has remained in the Christopherson family until 2006. Ytra-Nes (Ytrane), the home of granddaughter Carrie Humber, Ytra-Nes was among the places visited by President Vigdis
Finnbogadottir of Iceland during her trip to British Columbia in 1988.
Source: 1995 Icelandic Heritage Calendar, Icelandic League of North America.

Carrie’s father moved his family from Elgin to the homestead in 1925 when his mother died. The property was later divided among the seven Kristofferson offspring, and Veiga Dawe and her husband lived in the house. Mrs. Dawe was a substitute teacher at Crescent School. Carrie and her Mother moved back to be with Aunt Veiga when she became frail. Carrie notes that her grandfather first moved from Iceland to Argyle, Manitoba, to escape the famine and the volcanoes in his home country. He encouraged many Icelanders to settle in North America. Carrie’s aunt had wanted the road named Argyle, rather than Christopherson.
Source: Carrie Humber to Shirley Stonier

NOTE: This is probably the original text sent to me by Ed Fader, whose wife is Diana (nee Lowe, Anna Sveinsson's daughter) is a granddaughter of Arni Sveinsson, Sr.. Lara Lindo is granddaughter of Jon Sveinsson. Jon is the son of Arni Sveinsson, Sr. born 1851.
YTRANES, CRESCENT BEACH, B.C. (1904)
Gudrun Gisladottir
From our relative in Iceland, Gudrun Gisladottir.
Her relationship to Sigurdur and us
IMG_SCAN_2265_retouched_crop1
IMG_SCAN_2265_retouched
Sigurdur Christopherson

Enlarge to see Sveinn and Thordís Brynjolfsson
Courtesy of The Sig & Hank Christopherson Collection [59]
     


This is from an Icelandic Calendar (see "1st Homestead" image right)
October: ‘Ytra-Nes’ on the Pacific Coast, near Crescent, British Columbia, circa 1905 and 1910. – ‘Ytra-Nes’, meaning ‘Outer Ness’, according to Kormakur Hognason , was a 90 acre waterfront estate bought in 1904 by Sigurður Kristófersson from ‘Grund’ near Baldur (see back cover) – seen together with his wife, Carrie, to the left of the original shanty and on the balcony on the new house (see inset). Located on Semiahmoo Bay near Crescent (Surrey), British Columbia, this land had previously been owned by a Scotsman and was the site of an ancient ‘Indian fort’ (mound). The property also had fruit and walnut trees. Over the years, Icelandic neighbours established themselves nearby, including Sveinn and Thórdís Brynjólfsson, Kristján and Fríða Anderson, Runólfur and Sarah Björnson, and the Thorsteinn Stoneson family. In 1912 ‘Ytra-Nes’ became the home of son and daughter-in-law John and Vala Christopherson, and the new home (built prior to 1907) has remained in the Christopherson family ever since. Presently 2215 Christopherson Road and the home of granddaughter Carrie Humber, ‘Ytra-Nes’ was among the places visited by President Vigdís Finnbogadóttir of Iceland during her trip to British Columbia in 1988. (Photos courtesy of Donna L. Skardal, Baldur, Man., with thanks to Mrs. Carrie Humber).

Sigurður and Carrie's beautiful house still overlooked the bluff at Boundary bay and seaside until 2006. Ytrane, with many add-ons, and land were all sold off by its heir, Carrie Humber's youngest nephew, John Carver in spring of 2006. John researched having Ytrane relocated. None of the local Historical Societies showed any interest or offerred any land or interest in it's care. The house is very tall which would have required many public lines to be interrupted. The house had been added on to as well. The original cabin was made into a Pantry many years ago (see photos to right). Hopefully a Plaque might be placed down the road, marking Sigurdur's contributions to Canada.

The house sat in the west center of the lot and issues with the roadway was also a factor in the decision to sell the lot and take down Ytrane. Ed Fader mentioned to me it was up for sale, not enough funds to do anything. Christopherson Road which went to the property was scaled back. It still exists today. Roy is working on a compilation of hundreds of pages on the family, titled "Sigurðurs Saga". Passing down the family tree information was common for Icelanders as the Sagas prove, however it seems it skipped a generation with my grandfather, Kjartan, so we must pass the torch of information.

For the PDF version of following text, click here

From: Ed Fader
Date: May 18, 2006 10:58:25 PM PDT
Hi Roy
Some History of the Christopherson family in Ocean Park. Enclosed is a picture of the house taken around 1910 and still remains on the property. That is the house where Carrie and Luke Humber lived.

Ytra-Nes, meaning Outer Ness was a 90-acre waterfront estate bought in 1904 by Sigurdur Kristofersson from Iceland. Located near Crescent, the land had been previously owned by a Scotsman and was the site of an ancient Indian fort (mound). The property also had fruit and walnut trees. Over the years, Icelandic neighbours established themselves nearby, including the Sveinn, Brynjolfsson, Kristjan, Runolfur, Anderson, Bjornson and Stoneson families. In 1912, Ytra-Nes became the home of son and daughter-in-law John and Vala Christopherson and the new home, built prior to 1907, has remained in the Christopherson family ever since. Presently the home of granddaughter Carrie Humber, Ytra-Nes was among the places visited by President Vigdis Finnbogadottir of Iceland during her trip to British Columbia in 1988.
Source: 1995 Icelandic Heritage Calendar, Icelandic League of North America.

Carrie’s father [John S.] moved his family from Elgin to the homestead in 1925 when his mother died. The property was later divided among the seven Kristofferson offspring, and Veiga Dawe and her husband lived in the house. Mrs. Dawe was a substitute teacher at Crescent School. Carrie and her Mother moved back to be with Aunt Veiga when she became frail. Carrie notes that her grandfather first moved from Iceland to Argyle, Manitoba, to escape the famine and the volcanoes in his home country. He encouraged many Icelanders to settle in North America. Carrie’s aunt had wanted the road named Argyle, rather than Christopherson.
Source: Carrie Humber to Shirley Stonier
DOC_0001_Christopherson info_Surrey

Original PDF document of text above, see PDF_0015_00.09_OP18
Ocean Parker, September, 2000 Special Heritage Edition


From Ed Fader? From Calendar?
Ýranes
by Stefania Morris,
Luke and Carrie Humber welcome you to Ýranes. Carrie’s grandparents, Sigurðr and Caroline Christopherson, came here in 1904. They had bought 80 acres of ocean property and built a small house which is still part of the
I
Page 7 of 14 Tuesday, September 08, 2009 7:45:28 PM
Sigurðr and Caroline Christopherson, came here in 1904. They had bought 80 acres of ocean property and built a small house which is still part of the present building.

Sigurðr was born July 9, 1848, at Neslandum, Mýatn, in Iceland. He was the oldest of seven children. His father died in a typhoid epidemic while the children were very young. Sigurðr came to Canada when he was 25 years old. Sigurðr along with two other men went from Kinmount, Ontario, to the Keewatin district to find new land for the group of Icelanders. The land chosen was New Iceland. The men worked on the railroad until the Kinmount people came in October.

Caroline Taylor, better known as Carrie, was the niece of John Taylor who was doing missionary work with the British Bible Society, and Carrie who had met the Icelandic people including Sigurðr, asked her uncle to try to get financial help to see the Icelandic people through the winter.

Sigurður and Carrie were married January 20, 1877. Because the Icelandic settlement was still under quarantine for Smallpox they stood on one side of Netley Creek, the quarantine line, and the minister stood on the other side. Carrie was a schoolteacher and was the first teacher in the district. Sigurðr
had taken a homestead and named his place Husav’k. They farmed there for four years then he went and scouted for new land in the Argyle district. There they built a home and called the farm Grund. They had the post office and later a church was built there. The Grund church is now a heritage building. Sigurðr and Carrie were very active in the community. Carrie chose the name for the town of Baldur, and there is a Carrie Street named after her. Sigurðr made many trips to Iceland as an immigration agent. He brought out all his brothers and sisters and his then blind mother who, even though she could not see the oak trees, was very interested in them, also the pumpkins and vegetables in the garden. Later Sigurðr set up a real estate and insurance company with Carrie as secretary.

In 1903 Sigurðr was struck down with ill health and was confined to bed for some time. On doctor's advice he and Carrie traveled to the west coast.
They had bought the ocean property and when walked up to the over grown orchard they fell in love with the place and built their home of - Ýranes - the name of his parents’ place in Iceland. Sigurðr’s health improved after he came out here. Ýranes, the same as Grund, always had an open door. In earlier years, Icelandic picnics were held there and seniors from the Icelandic home Hšfn were brought out for outings.

Sigurðr died March 27, 1921. Carrie, the English girl who learned Icelandic and became an Icelander, lived until December 9, 1923. Christopherson Road still bears their name. Many of the Christophersons family moved out here as well as many other Icelandic people.
DOC_0008_Ytranes-1

READ MORE ABOUT YTRANES

READ MORE ABOUT SIGURDUR'S WIFE, Caroline TAYLOR Christopherson
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